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B.McKENNA
Gallipoli Historical Tours

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WW2 Belt finds its way home!

 

Many Pattern 37 waist belts were destroyed after the war.  One can only wonder where the belt of Walter HUNT had been laying for the past 75 odd years?  During that time, it could easily have been tossed into some garbage bin and ended up in land fill, or shoved into the corner of a  shed, where it would gradually succumb to damp and rot.  But by some small fortune it survived and was located for sale on eBay …. So every item has a story to tell.  
Many soldiers were issued a new uniform at war’s end.  So is this the belt which Walter used in service between 1942 and 1945?  Or is it in fact his “coming home” belt which he was issued just prior to discharge?  To quote a family member, “Walter was always immaculate and dressed perfectly without a thing out of place”. So perhaps Walter wore this belt when he proceeded home at the end of the war, and then threw it into a cupboard as he re-entered civilian life. The belt being long forgotten, until ending up in his deceased estate and/or put up for sale.  
His grandchildren certainly do not seem to have any memory of it.
Walter was on deployment to New Guinea when his first born child, baby Maureen came into the world during January of 1943 (PLEASE SEE ATTACHED PHOTOS). This places Walter in or around Port Moresby during the battle for the beach heads of Buna, Gona and Sanananda which ended the Kokoda campaign.  Whilst sadly Maureen has passed on, her children will receive this belt in time for ANZAC Day 2020 and are said to be over joyed at the prospect.
Walter Joseph HUNT once signed his name on a piece of paper, stating he was prepared to give his life if necessary, in service of his country.  He served on dusty roads in Australia and New Guinea.  The Japanese did not get him …. and he survived the risk of motor vehicle accident, malaria, dysentery, the threat of tropical ulcers and scrub typhus.  His Pattern 37 belt survived the war and 75 years of dubious storage.
The very least we can do this ANZAC Day, is ensure that Corona Virus (Covid 19) does not dampen his memory or cast a shadow over his service!  Returning his wartime belt to is grandchildren in time for ANZAC Day on the 25th of April was the highlight of our day!

Many Pattern 37 waist belts were destroyed after the war.  One can only wonder where the belt of Walter HUNT had been laying for the past 75 odd years?  During that time, it could easily have been tossed into some garbage bin and ended up in land fill, or shoved into the corner of a  shed, where it would gradually succumb to damp and rot.  But by some small fortune it survived and was located for sale on eBay …. So every item has a story to tell.  

 

Many soldiers were issued a new uniform at war’s end.  So is this the belt which Walter used in service between 1942 and 1945?  Or is it in fact his “coming home” belt which he was issued just prior to discharge?  To quote a family member, “Walter was always immaculate and dressed perfectly without a thing out of place”. So perhaps Walter wore this belt when he proceeded home at the end of the war, and then threw it into a cupboard as he re-entered civilian life. The belt being long forgotten, until ending up in his deceased estate and/or put up for sale.  

 

His grandchildren certainly do not seem to have any memory of it.

 

Walter may have been on deployment to New Guinea when his first born child, baby Maureen came into the world during January of 1943. If so, this places Walter in or around Port Moresby during the battle for the beach heads of Buna, Gona and Sanananda which ended the Kokoda campaign.  Whilst sadly Maureen has passed on, her children will receive this belt in time for ANZAC Day 2020 and are said to be over joyed at the prospect.

 

Walter Joseph HUNT once signed his name on a piece of paper, stating he was prepared to give his life if necessary, in service of his country.  He served on dusty roads in Australia and New Guinea.  The Japanese did not get him …. and he survived the risk of motor vehicle accident, malaria, dysentery, the threat of tropical ulcers and scrub typhus.  His Pattern 37 belt survived the war and 75 years of dubious storage.

The very least we can do this ANZAC Day, is ensure that Corona Virus (Covid 19) does not dampen his memory or cast a shadow over his service!  Returning his wartime belt to is grandchildren in time for ANZAC Day on the 25th of April was the highlight of our day!

 



HERDON Victory Medal returned in Australia

The First World War Victory Medal of Major Bertram Lawrence HERDON has been returned after being missing for nearly 100 years, just in time for the Centenary of Remembrance Day.  From Krakow in Poland to Spain, then around the world to Australia.  This missing medal awarded to an Englishman serving in the Indian Army truly has a global association.  The medal return took place at the ANZAC Memorial in Sydney Australia …. a long way from where Bertram served during the Great War.  This medal was returned in conjunction with the wonderful genealogy website Ancestry.com and this medal return really was an international affair.  Please see our blog in the ARTICLES OF INTEREST section of the Medals Gone Missing website.  

 

 



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